3 Ways to Fix a Loose Bike Chain

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3 Ways to Fix a Loose Bike Chain
3 Ways to Fix a Loose Bike Chain

Video: 3 Ways to Fix a Loose Bike Chain

Video: 3 Ways to Fix a Loose Bike Chain
Video: Fixing A Sagging Bike Chain 2023, September
Anonim

The bicycle chain, formed by a set of links (or links), connects the front wheel crown to the rear wheel ratchet and causes the pedals to move. It can come loose for a number of reasons: when it gets too dry, when gearshifts are done incorrectly, and when the bike has some kind of impact. Fortunately, all these problems have simple solutions. Your hands may be full of grease, but you'll be able to get back to pedaling in no time.

Steps

Method 1 of 3: Repositioning the Chain

Step 1. First of all, inspect the timing belt situation

If anything is bent or broken, straighten those parts before replacing the chain. In addition to examining the chain, you should see the status of the gears and the cassette (which are the gears). It is critical to carry out this inspection whenever you crash to ensure that such parts are not damaged.

After repairing the bike chain, it's a good idea to check the condition of the cassette, gears, and screws to see if they are all properly adjusted or to see if they need to be replaced

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 1
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 1

Step 2. Turn the bike upside down or secure it to a stand

This will make it easier to fix the chain and keep the wheels from turning while you work. Support it on the seat and handlebars; be careful not to scratch or damage the frame.

Brackets keep the bike suspended and are very useful for maintenance. However, the chain tends to have problems when riding (not at home) and you may not have access to the accessory

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 2
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 2

Step 3. See which gear the bike is set to

Shifts are the small parts that sit next to the front and rear wheels; are responsible for moving the current between gears. See where they are - lined up with the crown/ratchet. The chain must be reinserted there.

  • The front derailleur, which is next to the pedals, looks like a small metal bracket. It is above the gear where the chain should be.
  • The rear derailleur, in turn, is just below the ratchet (the gear set), near the rear wheel, and looks like a small mechanical arm. It moves back and forth to move the chain.
  • Many handlebars indicate the amount of gears on the bike, but you need to know how to interpret them to understand the information:

    • The left loop adjusts the front derailleur. Gear 1 is closest to the bike (smallest of the gears).
    • The right loop adjusts the rear derailleur. Gear 1 is closest to the bike (largest gear).
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 3
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 3

Step 4. Push the rear derailleur forward towards the handlebars to loosen the chain

This metal arm is close to the rear wheel gears. There is usually also a small square piece of metal in the region that can be used to push the gear without spreading grease. Gently push to release the chain.

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 4
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 4

Step 5. Use your other hand to reposition the chain over the right gear

Put it in the proper position using two or three fingers. Ideally, insert your notches into 10 to 15 gear teeth. When finished, slowly release the gear.

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 5
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 5

Step 6. Slowly move the pedals of the bike using one hand

Meanwhile, teeth manually attached to the sprocket will help the remainder of the chain to align. Cycle for another two or three cycles to make everything firmer.

Move the pedals forward - the rear wheel should turn in this process

Method 2 of 3: Taking Care of the Chain

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 6
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 6

Step 1. Take good care of the bicycle transmission to prevent the chain from coming loose

This system consists of all the parts that make the wheels turn: a crown (large gear set, next to the pedals), the ticket gate (set of gears on the rear wheel), the rear derailleur (metal arm that is on the back wheel) and the chain in itself. When dirt, debris and soot accumulates, the transmission wears out and is more likely to come loose or suffer other damage.

  • Frequent transmission maintenance and cleaning can greatly extend the life of the bicycle.
  • To handle this accessory, turn the bike upside down or use a support to suspend it.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 7
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 7

Step 2. Use an old cloth to run a biodegradable degreaser on the chain

This powerful soap, also called a biodegradable solvent, cleans dirt from the chain without spoiling it. In bicycle stores, it is usually found near lubricants. Apply some of it to a damp cloth and press it lightly onto the chain with one hand. With the other, move the pedals, doing two or three cycles.

  • Rotate the pedals in two or three cycles, exerting pressure above and below the chain. Then turn them one more time, pressing the sides of the transmission.
  • Carefully wipe any grease or soot residues you find with the cloth.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 8
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 8

Step 3. Use a bicycle or toothbrush to clean the areas between the gears

As with human teeth, the gears need to be serviced from time to time. Apply the degreaser to the brush and pass it between each gear while moving the pedals with your other hand. This will remove grease buildup (which could loosen the chain if not removed).

Clean small, sharp or hard-to-reach areas with a screwdriver

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 9
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 9

Step 4. Clean the soot from the gears and the ratchet

Remove any traces of dirt you find. Make the bike shiny using the damp cloth, brush and a little degreaser to clean its entire frame. If possible, take the cloth/brush to the location that needs maintenance and move the pedals to clean. Here are some common areas:

  • The two sides of the pulleys, the little gears that are on the gearshift arm.
  • The back (closest to the bike) of the crown.
  • The frame, gaskets and other parts close to the chain.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 10
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 10

Step 5. Buy a more powerful cleaner if the current is heavily affected by soot

If the cloth and brush don't work, use a cleaner. This "box" immobilizes the chain for easy maintenance; then just add the degreaser to its interior and move the pedals - to automatically brush and clean everything. Such products are cheap (costing between R$ 20.00 and R$ 200.00, according to the brand) and their kits can even include a degreaser and a brush.

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 11
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 11

Step 6. Lubricate the bicycle chain after cleaning it.

The product can also protect it from dirt and moisture. After cleaning and drying the belt with the cloth, move the pedals slowly and apply a drop of lubricant to every two or four links (where they meet). Then shift the bike's gear to apply another ten or twelve drops. When finished, remove excess product with the cloth - as lubricant residues can facilitate the accumulation of dirt and soot.

  • Ideally, apply a thin layer of lubricant over the entire chain.
  • Apply lubricant to the chain whenever you're cleaning it, riding in the rain, or hearing it squeak.
  • Feel the current with your fingers; if it is too dry, apply lubricant.

Method 3 of 3: Fixing Frequent Problems with the Chain

Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 12
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 12

Step 1. Learn to shift gears properly on slopes to prevent the chain from coming loose

Incorrect exchanges damage the transmission; if the pressure exerted is too tense, it can loosen or even break. This process moves the chain, and if the bike is going uphill, it may not "reach" the sprocket of the next gear. Here are some tips for not getting it wrong:

  • Change gears regularly and before going over hills. Don't wait until the ride gets harder. Ideally, your feet maintain constant speed.
  • When shifting gears, reduce the pressure on the pedals. During the movement, relax your feet (as if breathing more calmly); do not stop moving them, but reduce the weight exerted. Do this simultaneously with the actual gear shift and finally resume normal pace.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 13
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 13

Step 2. If the chain always comes loose in the same direction, adjust the stop screws

This can happen if it misaligns when you shift the bike into the heaviest gear (left or right side). These screws "request" the gearshift to stop moving in that specific direction and - if they are too high, they will keep the chain moving after the change, even if there is no next gear. The bike's front and rear derailleurs feature small limiters. They bear the letters "H" ("High", or "high") and "L" ("Low", or "low").

  • Turn screw "H" clockwise to prevent the chain from moving too far away from the bike on the right side.
  • Turn the "L" screw clockwise to prevent the chain from moving too far away from the bike on the left side and coming closer to the wheel.
  • If you're riding in the extreme gear of the bike, you'll see the gear shift as you adjust the screws. It should be aligned in the middle of the region.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 14
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 14

Step 3. Replace chain links that are bent or stuck.

This process is not laborious, although it is necessary to use a special tool to remove and replace the belt pins. Buy all the necessary materials at a bicycle store. Move the pedals to find the damaged link, checking for other bent items. Remove the right pins (small circular objects) and then use the tool to install the spare part.

  • Try to line up all the pins and don't let any of them stick out.
  • So-called "master links" are special pieces that can be added to the chain; they have special (interlocking) notches that facilitate their installation.
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 15
Fix a Slipped Bike Chain Step 15

Step 4. See if the chain is worn

Over time, friction wears down the chain and ratchet, preventing the gear teeth from attaching well to them. To check the condition of the belt, use a 12-inch ruler and measure the distance between twelve pins in the chain itself. The pins are the small circles that are in the middle of the links (seen when the links are examined by LED). If the twelfth pin is more than 3mm unstuck, buy a new chain.

  • If the chain is rusty or its links get stuck frequently, buy new parts.
  • Chains tend to wear out in less time than ratchets; luckily they are also cheaper.
Change to Rear Cassette Step 2
Change to Rear Cassette Step 2

Step 5. See if you need to change the turnstile

It is more difficult to determine the state of this part than the current; however, if you suspect something, it's best to change it at once. If the belt "skips" a few sprocket teeth, becomes loose, or becomes defective frequently, replace the ratchet. If you want a professional evaluation, take the bike to a store.

After cleaning the turnstile, examine the gears. Are there any disparities between them with regard to condition and wear? If yes, buy a new part

Tips

To avoid problems, it is essential to clean the chain every two to three weeks

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