5 Ways to Quote a Photograph

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5 Ways to Quote a Photograph
5 Ways to Quote a Photograph
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The use of a photograph in a publication, website or in any work you create should always be referenced to protect the photographer's image property and allow your readers access to the work for greater detail. You will likely use one of three citation styles depending on the type of work being written. The APA (American Psychological Association) style is geared toward social science work; the MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used in the humanities and liberal arts; and the Chicago Manual of Style, or CMS (in English, Chicago Manual of Style), is used to cite photographs in published books. In Brazil, of course, the most used style is ABNT. Keep in mind, however, that the standard required for your publication may vary.

Steps

Method 1 of 5: Requesting Permission to Use a Photograph

Quote Photograph Step 1

Step 1. Determine whether or not you need permission to publish the photograph

In most cases, you will need permission from the photographer or publisher before publishing a photograph in a magazine, book, or website.

  • Non-commercial articles aimed at academic study, in general, do not require the author of the images to authorize their use, as long as they are properly referenced.
  • Most photographs created before 1922 are in the public domain no matter how they are used.
Quote Photograph Step 2

Step 2. Determine the perimeters of publishing rights you will need

The extent to which your publication will reach will determine the type of rights needed. It will also determine the amount of money you will need to pay.

  • In most cases, the greater the publication's circulation and the more prominently the photograph is, the more expensive the right to use will be.
  • Again, you probably won't need to pay for permission if you're using the photograph in a newspaper that won't have circulation.
Quote from Photograph Step 3

Step 3. Contact the photographer or publisher of the work to obtain permission to use it

In the case of very private photographs, it is always a good idea to contact the authors to find out if you have permission to use their work. If payment is required, you should receive a high resolution copy of the photograph to use in your work.

Quote from Photograph Step 4

Step 4. Quote the photographer, being careful to credit the appropriate sources

Obtaining permission and properly citing the photographer will help you avoid a legal dispute later on.

Method 2 of 5: Citing an image in ABNT standards

Step 1. Create a title

The first thing you want to do is create a numbered title for your image. Right-click on the image and access the "Create Legend" menu. Next, add a title for the image.

  • Note that every image must start with a term such as "Picture" or "Image" followed by its number.
  • An example: "Figure 1: Reproduction of wikiHow image".

Step 2. Below the image, indicate the source

In most cases, just put the words "Available on:. Access on: day, abbreviated month and year". If this is a screenshot, just type "Screenshot" before "Available in:".

An example: Screenshot. Available in:. Accessed on September 17th. 2018

Step 3. End

You don't need to put more details in the bibliographic references of your text. In the case of monographs, dissertations and theses, however, it is recommended to create an image index at the beginning of the work, right after the Abstract.

Method 3 of 5: Citing a Photograph Using APA Style

Quote from Photograph Step 5

Step 1. Create a caption

APA Style requires a caption to be placed directly below the image, which must be embedded in the text. Include the following information in the APA citation:

  • A figure number. All photographers on paper must be numbered sequentially. Write the word "Figure", followed by a number, followed by a period. All in italics. Example: Figure 1.
  • The title of the photo in italics. Include the full title of the photo, followed by a period. Example: Walking Through the Woods.
  • A description. Write a brief explanation of why the photograph is being used. Alternatively, you can simply include the publication date of the photo.
Quote from Photograph Step 6

Step 2. Create a reference

Include a complete reference in the References section at the end of the work. The full reference must be written as described below:

  • Start with the author's name (in this case, the author is the creator of the image, or photographer). Write the last name (last name), followed by a comma, followed by the initial of the first name, followed by a period. Example: Parks, G. If the author's name is not available, omit this information.
  • Write the word "Photographer" in parentheses. Keep the word capitalized and followed by a period after the parentheses. Example: (Photographer).
  • Write the year the image was created.
  • Write the title of the work in italics. Put a period after the title. Example: American Gothic, Washington, DC.
  • Write the word "Photograph" in parentheses. Make sure the word is capitalized and followed by a period after the parentheses. Example: (Photograph).
  • If you found the image online, write the date the image was accessed in this format: Month Day, Year. Example: February 28, 2013.
  • Type the word "from" followed by the URL. Example: from:
Quote from Photograph Step 7

Step 3. Use as much information as you can find

Do your best to find the photographer's name, the name of the photograph and the date it was created. If there's any information you can't find, leave it out.

Method 4 of 5: Citing a Photograph Using the MLA Style

Quote from Photograph Step 8

Step 1. Create a caption

Include the following information in an MLA-style caption:

  • A figure number. The figure number should be cited both in the text (such as "see Figure 1") and below the photograph. The word "Figure" can be abbreviated as "Fig."
  • The title of the photo in italics.
  • A brief job description.
  • A partial or complete reference to the work. If you provide a full reference below the photo, it is not necessary to duplicate it on the Works Cited page at the end of the work. In any case, the reference details indicated in the next step must appear in full in the work.
Quote from Photograph Step 9

Step 2. Create a reference

Include the reference either as part of the photo caption, or in the Works Cited section. The reference must include the following components:

  • The last (preferably last) name of the photographer, followed by a comma, followed by the first name, followed by a period. Example: Parks, Gordon.
  • The title of the photo in italics, followed by a period. Example: American Gothic, Washington, DC.
  • The year the photograph was created.
  • The name of the institution or collection from which the photograph came. Example: Parks Collection.
  • If you are citing a photo you found in a book, please include this additional information in the following format: Book Title. First-name Last-name of author/editor. City of publication: Publisher, year. Page number. Means of reproduction. Example: The Best of Parks. New York: Random House, 1999. Plate 88. Print.
  • If you are citing a photo found online, please include this additional information in the following format: Database or website title. Database or website editor/sponsor. Half consulted. Access date.. Example: Parks Online. University of Parks. Web. February 18, 2013. .
Quote Photograph Step 10

Step 3. Use as much information as you can find

Do your best to find the photographer's name, the name of the photograph and the date it was created. If there's any information you can't find, leave it out.

Method 5 of 5: Citing a photograph using CMS

Quote Photograph Step 11

Step 1. Create a caption

Each photograph must have a caption directly below it, including the following information:

  • A figure number. Type "Figure" or "Fig." followed by a number.
  • The photographer's full name, followed by a period.
  • The name of the photo in italics, followed by a period.
  • The date the photograph was created, followed by a period.
  • If available, the city in which the photograph is located, followed by a comma, followed by the name of the museum or collection in which the image resides, followed by a period.
Quote Photograph Step 12

Step 2. Create a reference

If you found the photograph in a book or website, a full reference must be included in the bibliography at the end of your work. Include the following information in the full reference:

  • The figure number. Type "Figure" or "Fig." followed by your number.
  • The photographer's full name, followed by a period.
  • The name of the photo in italics, followed by a period.
  • The date the photograph was created, followed by a period.
  • If available, the city in which the photograph is located, followed by a comma, followed by the name of the museum or collection in which the image resides, followed by a period.
  • The word "Source" followed by a colon.
  • If you found the photograph in a book, please include this additional information in the following format: first-name last-author's name. Book's title. City of publication: Publisher, date of publication. Plate number. Example: Chris O'Brien. The Best of Parks. New York: Random House, 1999. Plate 88.
  • If you found the photograph online, please include this additional information in the following format: Site name, URL (access date). Example: University of Parks Online, http://parksonline.org (February 9, 2013).
Quote from Photograph Step 13

Step 3. Use as much information as you can find

Do your best to find the photographer's name, the name of the photograph and the date it was created. If there's any information you can't find, leave it out.

Tips

  • Use the style chosen by your professor, academic institution, publisher or employer.
  • Many companies and institutions have their own custom guides to consistently present their brand in a manner approved by their communications department.

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