How to Teach 11-20 Number Recognition

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How to Teach 11-20 Number Recognition
How to Teach 11-20 Number Recognition
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Once children can recognize the numbers 1 to 10, you can start teaching them the numbers 11 to 20. Understanding them requires more than just counting and recognizing: it requires a knowledge of tens, units, and a sense bigger of how the numbers work. Teaching these concepts can be challenging; for ideas, go to Step 1.

Steps

Part 1 of 3: Introducing the numbers 11 to 20

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 1

Step 1. Present the numbers one at a time

Starting at 11, teach the children the numbers one at a time. Write the figure on the board and include a picture: To teach 11, draw 11 flowers, 11 cars, or 11 smiley faces.

Incorporating the concept of a tens board at this point can help, including one with the correct number of units. To learn more about the tens board, see Part 2

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 2

Step 2. Teach children to count to 20

They can often learn to count to this number easily by repeating and memorizing. Make it even easier by working with the numbers two by two: first count to 12, then count to 14, and so on.

Realize, however, that teaching children to count to 20 is not the same as teaching them to understand numerical values. Counting needs to be accompanied by other lessons aimed at numerical awareness and understanding

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 3

Step 3. Practice writing the numbers

After the children know the individual numbers and can count to 20 in the correct order, have them practice writing the numbers. For best results, ask them to say the numbers aloud as they write.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 4

Step 4. Create a number line

Showing children a line marked at equal intervals with the numbers 0 to 20 can help them visualize the progression.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 5

Step 5. Embed objects

Some children learn best using objects they can touch. Have them contain sticks, pencils, cubes, marbles, or other small items, and reinforce the fact that if they count objects one by one, the number they reach when they stop will equal the number of objects accumulated.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 6

Step 6. Make learning physical

Ask the children to count the steps; the stairs are great for this, but walking from one side of the room to the other will do, too. Another alternative: make them jump 20 times and count the jumps.

Hopscotch games are good for this purpose: Draw 10 squares on the floor and fill them in with numbers 1-10. Ask the children to count from 1 to 10 as they jump forward and from 11 to 20 as they come back

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 7

Step 7. Reinforce the numbers whenever you can

Take every opportunity you have to count to 20 and demonstrate number awareness. The more children practice, the better the results.

Part 2 of 3: Teaching tens and units

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 8

Step 1. Explain the basic concept of tens and units

Tell the children that all numbers 11 through 19 are made up of a dozen and an additional number of units. The number 20 is made up of two whole tens.

Help the children visualize this concept by writing the number 11 and next to it showing a 10 and a unit separated by a circle

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 9

Step 2. Present the Tens Charts

These frames have 10 empty spaces, filled during counting. You can use coins or other small objects to demonstrate or draw on the blackboard.

To make a good activity, give each child 2 tens and 20 objects. Ask them to create the number 11: a full ten board and one with only one unit on it. Have them create the other numbers. You can also reverse the process, starting with full tens and taking out the objects

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 10

Step 3. Try using dashes and dots

Show the children that it is possible to represent these numbers with dashes and dots: first for tens and last for ones. Demonstrate that the number 15, for example, is made up of 1 dash and 5 dots.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 11

Step 4. Draw a T table

Make a T on a large piece of paper; the left column represents the tens and the right column the units. Fill in the right column with the numbers 1 to 10 in sequence and leave the left column blank. Then:

  • Add representative numbers of objects, such as cubes, to the units column: 1 cube next to the number 1, 2 cubes next to the 2, and so on.
  • Explain that you can represent a 10 with 10 cubes or a larger stick.
  • Fill in the 1 in 1 tens column and explain how these numbers work together to create bigger ones.

Part 3 of 3: Reinforcing the numbers 11 to 20 with fun activities

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 12

Step 1. Play memory games with numbered cards

Use sets of cards labeled with numbers 1 to 20 to play a memory game. The children turn the cards face down and then look for the pairs.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 13

Step 2. Fill containers with small objects

Have the children fill the containers with small items: 11 buttons, 12 grains of rice, 13 coins, and so on. Let them count the objects and label the containers with the appropriate numbers.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 14

Step 3. Read picture books

There are many books of this type that deal with the numbers 1 to 20 available. Read them together.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 15

Step 4. Sing songs

Counting songs help reinforce understanding of the number sequence in a fun way.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 16

Step 5. Play "Who has the number":

give the children cards with numbers 11 to 20 and ask, "Who has the number 15"? Wait for the child with the appropriate card to get up.

You can make this game more challenging by asking more complex questions like "Who has the number 13 plus 2"? Or having students divide their numbers into tens and units as they stand

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 17

Step 6. Let the kids correct their counting mistakes

Count from 1 to 20 out loud, making random mistakes, and allow children to point them out. You can also do the same with sequences of cards or number lines.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 18

Step 7. Have the children use their hands

Choose two children and give one of them the role of a ten: raise the 2 open hands in the air to show 10 fingers. The second child is the unit: he must lift the proper number of fingers to create the number you ask for.

Teach Recognition of Numbers 11 to 20 Step 19

Step 8. Create numerical stations in the room

Set up a station for each number from 11 to 20. For 11, for example, label a disk with the word "eleven", the number 11, and a photo of 11 objects. Also, lay out any 11 items. Do the same for each number and ask the children to circle around to identify the various seasons.

Tips

  • Do your best to make these lessons fun, as children learn better from fruitful activities than from reading.
  • Remember that each child has different learning styles; some may prefer images, others may need to touch the materials. Always offer a variety of lessons suitable for different learning styles.

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