4 Ways to Stimulate a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder with Massage

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4 Ways to Stimulate a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder with Massage
4 Ways to Stimulate a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder with Massage
Anonim

Dogs with spinal cord injuries (common in some breeds, such as dachshunds) cannot urinate on their own. In this case, the animal's bladder needs to be massaged by the owner regularly so that he can empty it. Unfortunately, this takes a lot of commitment from the person, but with a little practice, any owner who really loves their dog can perfect the technique for performing the massage.

Steps

Method 1 of 4: Understanding the Basics

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 1

Step 1. Find out what complications can occur when a dog cannot urinate correctly

Difficulty excreting urine can lead to certain problems, such as urinary tract infections, and burning from prolonged contact with urine.

  • Full or incontinence bladders are the most suitable environment for bacteria that cause urinary infections, which can have fatal consequences.
  • It is also important not to allow the animal's bladder to become too full, as this can lead to loss of bladder tone. Even after regaining control of the bladder, the dog will have difficulty getting the bladder to work properly.
Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 2

Step 2. Remember that it takes a lot of commitment

Choosing to help the dog urinate requires a lot of commitment, as this should be done four to six times a day.

Luckily, it's only 10 or 20 seconds per massage, but many veterinarians recommend that pet owners not attempt this as it's an important daily commitment. Unfortunately, this is the only option, unless you prefer to euthanize the animal with the supervision of a veterinarian

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 3

Step 3. Understand how your dog's urinary system works

The bladder needs to be constantly emptied or the urine will become toxic to the animal. Urine will not come out on its own, leaking out when the bladder can no longer store it, as the kidneys will be producing more fluid (the rest will not be affected). That's why dogs with physical problems are so susceptible to urinary tract infections.

But what about feces? Feces are different from urine and can come out on their own, without the owner's help, after some time. There is no risk of it getting stuck and causing infections

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 4

Step 4. Consult a veterinarian for instructions

He will be able to demonstrate the right way to do the massage and how much pressure to apply. If necessary, come back the next day and perform the procedure under professional supervision, ensuring that all urine is removed from the animal's bladder.

Method 2 of 4: Emptying a Small Female's Bladder

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 5

Step 1. Squat down in front of the toilet and hold the dog with its back over it, positioning the dog's body over your left leg or knee

The dog should be looking behind you.

This can also be done outside on the grass, but it should be easier to take the pet to the toilet

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 6

Step 2. Stabilize the dog with your left hand

Place your right hand under his body.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 7

Step 3. Under the bitch's abdomen, bring your fingers together as if you were going to get a lemon

Tap to see if there's something the size of a lemon and the consistency of a balloon filled with water.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 8

Step 4. Squeeze gently, pushing a little towards the animal's back

It takes practice, but the trickiest part is learning what it feels like to have your bladder in your hands.

  • This is when the veterinarian can help you with explanations and demonstrations.
  • The dog can lift its tail when you find the right spot.
Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 9

Step 5. Check that the bladder has been completely emptied

When the stream of urine loses its intensity, the bladder is almost empty. It will feel “flattened” when fully emptying itself, which should take less than a minute.

Method 3 of 4: Emptying a Small Male's Bladder

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 10

Step 1. Take the dog outside

With males, it is more difficult to “target” the urine, so emptying it into the toilet is more difficult. Stand or crouch.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 11

Step 2. Hold the dog in the left arm, in a horizontal position and with the back resting on the left leg

The left hand should support the dog in the rib cage region.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 12

Step 3. Place your right hand under the dog

Feel just above the base of Organs genitals to find the bladder; sometimes it gets more up.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 13

Step 4. Tighten carefully

Urine curves to the right to enter the urethra, so there is no need to squeeze in any direction. Keep squeezing until the bladder is “flattened”.

Method 4 of 4: Emptying a Large Dog's Bladder

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 14

Step 1. Make an “equipment” for him to relieve himself

To assemble it, get a stepladder, a bar, and a flexible strap. To adjust the height of the strap that will hold the animal's abdomen, place some nails along the bar. Securely attach the nails (or screws) to the areas where the strap hangs from the bar. The handles must be movable, allowing you to be able to lift the dog's back; also leave the nails a few centimeters apart and not too close together, making it easier to gradually adjust the height.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 15

Step 2. Use the strap to help the dog stand up and walk under the stairs

If he can't walk with his front legs, you should carry him to the right position.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 16

Step 3. Place the bar between the two ends of the strip and on the steps of the ladder

With nails, fasten the strap to the bar, starting at very close distances.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 17

Step 4. Adjust the height of the strap with the nails on the bar

Place the strap supports in different positions on the bar, moving one side and one nail at a time until the dog's back is supported but not too high. Hind feet should be only a few inches off the ground.

While adjusting the strap, support the weight of the animal's back. With one arm, hold the dog up and adjust the position of the strap with the other

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 18

Step 5. Release the back of the pet and let the strap hold it

The “equipment” should keep her up safely.

Express a Paralyzed Dog's Bladder Step 19

Step 6. With both hands, massage the dog's bladder by applying a little pressure on both sides

He will learn to let go of his body weight, allowing you to hold him in the right position. Position the strap so that the bladder is directly behind it; doing so will make it easy to find and massage.

All of this should only take about five minutes. If necessary, one person can use this technique alone (for a 31 kg dog)

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