4 Ways to Prevent Your Cat from Chewing on Power and Charger Wires

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4 Ways to Prevent Your Cat from Chewing on Power and Charger Wires
4 Ways to Prevent Your Cat from Chewing on Power and Charger Wires
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Cats are less likely to chew cables compared to dogs, but every precaution must be taken to ensure the safety of felines if they do. This attitude not only damages the wires, it can also result in terrible harm to your cat, such as electric shock or suffocation. Remember, however, that this behavior is typical of young teething animals, and that even the most devoted chewers tend to stop when they grow up.

Steps

Method 1 of 4: Finding and Minimizing Cables

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 1

Step 1. Find out where your home's electrical hazards are

Every electrical item is a possible danger for a cat, as they are objects that the animal can reach. Take special care with wires from appliances, computers and printing equipment, cables used temporarily for items like flashers, wires in places you can't reach but your cat can (eg behind heavy objects like refrigerators, freezers, heaters and televisions) and all outlets.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 2

Step 2. Keep gaps between cable shields and termination points as small as possible

The most vulnerable parts of the cord are where it joins the plug or appliance. These sections are not easy to protect with kits. Check them regularly.

If the space between an appliance such as a refrigerator is wide enough for a cat to sneak in, you will need to take precautions to protect the relevant power cord and outlet

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 3

Step 3. Unplug unnecessary appliances and store them in a safe place from cats until needed

When using them, do not leave them unattended or confine use to feline-free spaces. There's no point in leaving unused electronics piling up and taking up space when they can be stored neatly, dust-free and chewed.

Method 2 of 4: Hiding the Cables

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 4

Step 1. Rearrange furniture to protect wires that are hanging or tend to move

Block the base or back of tables or shelves that have a gap between the floor and the bottom of the unit, or between the wall and the back of the unit. Keep in mind that cats can enter openings much smaller than your fist, depending on the size of the animal. The cat can also move objects that are not securely fastened or that are heavy. Hide as much of the cable as you can. Store unnecessary appliances in a safe, cat-free location.

Consider using wireless technology whenever possible, confining wires to transmitters or cat-free areas

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 5

Step 2. Place small appliances and chargers in boxes or drawers

The cat won't be able to reach many of the smaller, more attractive cables if you can create a charging station in a drawer. Placing wired items inside boxes with a hole in the back can also hide their true function and make the chance of a pussy attacking them less likely.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 6

Step 3. Secure all wires with tape so they don't dangle

It is the swing that often attracts the cat. Once securely attached to a table leg or a wall, the cable blends in and stops drawing the same attention. You can also buy velcro or special fasteners to keep the threads close to another item.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 7

Step 4. Buy channels

They are available at home improvement stores, in a variety of shapes and colors. Some attach to the wall and furniture, while others just join the cables. No matter what type you choose, these are plastic covers for your hair that cannot be chewed by a cat.

Method 3 of 4: Making Cables Uninteresting

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 8

Step 1. Make them taste bad

Spray or apply something the cat doesn't like to the hair. There are commercial and homemade solutions; if you plan to make your own, consider using ingredients such as hot sauce, lavender oil, a citrus or vinegar paste, garlic, cayenne, Vick, detergent, lime juice, oil, or pepper paste. Some people use a light coating of ointment with menthol or deodorant. Allow the applied substance to dry completely before reconnecting the cable to the wall. It will be necessary to reapply the homemade solutions from time to time. Avoid using salty things, as cats love to lick salt.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 9

Step 2. Cover the strands with something solid that prevents chewing

Commercial products include flexible, transparent and protective cable covers with a citrus scent to keep the feline away. They are easy to install and do not require topical reapplications.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 10

Step 3. Disguise the cables with tape

Either aluminum or double-sided tape can do. They are sold at home improvement stores and are easy to wrap around the yarn. In the case of aluminum tape, cats don't like the alkaline taste in their mouths and will avoid chewing anything covered with it. With double-sided, they hate sticky things and won't touch it. The problem with this method is that it is sticky, and therefore complicated; in addition, it will collect a lot of fur.

Method 4 of 4: Distracting Your Cat

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 11

Step 1. Try noises or quick actions to stop the pussy

There are several things you can do if you catch the feline in the act. Yelling "NO" or clapping whenever he gets close to the wire is a possibility. Another is to keep a water pistol nearby to spray the animal with water if it gets too close to places you don't want it to go. Obviously, be careful not to hit electronic or electrical equipment with the liquid.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 12

Step 2. Use a noisy motion detector

You might find a motion-detecting toy that makes a sound as soon as it senses movement, like a frog croaking. Consider placing it in a strategic position to fire whenever the cat gets close to some vulnerable wires, such as under a computer table. The noise will need to be loud and sudden enough to frighten the cat, and there is a chance the animal will get used to it and ignore you.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 13

Step 3. Find distractions

Chewing cables can be a sign of boredom, a practice of predation or just a need to play. Try bringing new items into the house to keep your cat interested: a piece of rug, cardboard boxes to tear up, or even a chewable toy for dogs.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 14

Step 4. Try using cat grass

Buy or grow some cat grass using oats or wheat. Many cats feel the need to chew grass, and without it, the next most similar items are wires and cables. This grass is available at pet stores and on the internet, but you can buy oat and wheat seeds and grow them yourself in a pot with a little soil. It is even possible to remove a clod from a garden that has not been treated with pesticides or herbicides. See if the clod contains only blades of grass and no weeds. Place it in a vase on the floor and let the cat chew. Return the clod to its original location when the animal is finished. Repeat as often as needed.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 15

Step 5. Give your cat lots of fun toys

When cats chew cables, they are often looking for a way to create little toys for themselves. The short strands flutter wonderfully across the hardwood and linoleum floors when they're hit by a furry paw. You can try to distract the animal with another type of toy. Only avoid those that encourage chewing behavior, such as those who use string, wool and others.

Keep Cats from Chewing on Electric Cords and Chargers Step 16

Step 6. Keep the cat away when moving wired items

There are some activities where wire movement is unavoidable, and it's probably better to keep the cat out of the room or space where you'll be using such appliances rather than risking the cord being chewed, you or your cat getting an electric shock. or a heavy item falls on the animal if the string is pulled too hard.

Tips

  • If you cover vulnerable cables with a non-toxic substance your cat hates to smell or taste, protect your furniture, walls, floor and carpet by ensuring that any product used retains its potency after drying without staining anything.
  • Take the cat to the vet to make sure there's no problem with his teeth that's making him want to chew on wires.
  • Wrap the cables and place them in a plastic bag with a zipper. You can then use an upside-down can of compressed air to dampen the strand with the liquid. Most of these cans contain a bitter to prevent children from using the product to poison themselves. It tastes awful. Let the cat taste it later, and it will probably be the last time he chews on the cord.
  • An easy and super cheap alternative to all of the above solutions is to buy channels. They are tube-shaped structures made to handle cables, but they serve a dual purpose, arranging all the hanging wires in a nice, tidy, cat-proof container. Voila! Problem solved.
  • A cheap option is a simple straw. Putting one in each room will give the cat something to chew and play with.

Notices

  • If your feline swallows any lengths of yarn, go straight to the vet. These pieces can become lodged in the animal's intestine and cause a lot of problems.
  • Check the condition of your cables regularly. Cats are small, smart and persistent. They can damage the wire without cutting it, and a damaged cable can cause a fire. Replace or repair it immediately.
  • In addition to strings and cables, keep string, string and rubber bands away from your cat. Not only do they encourage the same chewing behavior, they can be fatal to your furry friend if swallowed. They can get tangled up in the intestines and cause serious medical problems. If you suspect your cat may have swallowed a string, you might want to take him to the vet, just in case.
  • Don't make a habit of yelling at your cat, or the feline may become aggressive or antisocial.

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