3 Ways to Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death

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3 Ways to Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death
3 Ways to Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death
Anonim

No one can make the pain or sadness of someone who has suffered the loss of a friend or family member go away. Grief is an intense and powerful feeling that causes discomfort for those who are suffering and for everyone around them. You may feel a little awkward, not knowing what to say to your friend. However, it is possible to help a grieving person with great compassion, understanding and kindness.

Steps

Method 1 of 3: Be Aware of the Grief Process

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 1

Step 1. Be patient

There is no right or wrong when it comes to grief, and it can take a person months or even years to get over it.

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 2

Step 2. Tell your friend that it is perfectly normal and acceptable to feel anger, guilt, fear, depression, and regret

The grieving process is a roller coaster of emotions. The first day, the person will probably not feel like getting out of bed, while the next day they may feel like screaming, screaming, and even laughing.

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 3

Step 3. Keep your friend company

Sometimes people in mourning feel isolated and alone. You don't need to have all the answers. In fact, at times, the best you can do is listen to your friend and provide your shoulder and hug.

Method 2 of 3: What to Tell a Grieving Friend

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 4

Step 1. Face death

You can help a grieving friend by not being afraid to use the word "death". By trying to defuse the situation, you can make the person angry. Don't say anything like, "I hear you lost your husband." Her husband is not lost. He died.

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 5

Step 2. Show your friend that you care

Be honest when communicating with your grieving friend. "I'm sorry" is a good expression in this situation.

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 6

Step 3. Offer your assistance

It's okay to tell your friend that you don't know what to do, but also let him know that you'd like to help anyway. You can do various things to help, such as shopping, mowing the lawn, and so on.

Method 3 of 3: Help a Grief Friend

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 7

Step 1. Take the initiative and offer to help a grieving friend, or show up unannounced, ready for work

  • Take food to your friend. Usually, mourners forget to eat. Bring a snack or food that the person likes and make sure they are properly fed.
  • Help with funeral arrangements. If your friend has never had such an experience, he won't know how to prepare a funeral. You can help by offering to write the obituary, to look for a church for the wake, and you can help find a pastor or celebrant to speak at the memorial.
  • Clean your friend's house. The person must be in a state of shock and in no condition to do their normal day-to-day tasks. Often, family and friends from other cities come to stay with the person and also help with whatever is needed.
Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 8

Step 2. Continue to offer your support, even after the funeral

Grief takes time to pass, and you can help your friend stay in touch even after the funeral. Call him, take him to lunch, talk to him about the person who died.

Make a Friend Feel Better After a Death Step 9

Step 3. Watch for signs of severe depression

It's normal for the grieving person to feel depressed, but if they can't get out of the house to go to school or work, if they're having trouble sleeping, or if they can't eat (or if they eat too much all the time), they can need help.

  • The grieving process varies from person to person. If your friend is not getting better or mentions suicide, intervene.
  • Take your friend to a help group or make an appointment with a doctor if he or she is talking a lot about dying, hallucinating, unable to do normal activities, etc.

Tips

  • Don't tell the person you know what they're feeling unless you've been through something like that.
  • Don't say the person who died is in a better place. The person will not believe it and will respond that the best place for the person to be would be here on Earth, with life.
  • Never tell a grieving person that they must get over the pain soon. This can irritate her or make her think she should have gotten over it. The mourning of each has a different rhythm.
  • Remember that everyone reacts to death in a different way. It's okay not to want to talk about the person who died, but it's not good when that becomes the main topic.
  • Don't leave your friend alone, but don't cling to him all the time either. He also needs space.
  • Hug your friend and say you're sorry for what happened.

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