3 Ways to Wind the New Line on the Reel

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3 Ways to Wind the New Line on the Reel
3 Ways to Wind the New Line on the Reel
Anonim

Over time, and after being stored during the off-season months, your fishing line will wear out and develop a "memory" for being wrapped around the spool, making assembly more difficult and tangling more likely. For best results, replace the fishing line at least once a season. This article will show you how to do this correctly.

Steps

Method 1 of 3: Reel

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 1

Step 1. Reload a reel

It's that thing that hangs below the pole.

  • Check the direction in which the bobbin turns. Some rotate clockwise, others counterclockwise, depending on the brand. Now look at the new roll and check the direction that the new line unwinds from the roll.
  • For each reel make sure bobbin rotation and roll unwinding match. In other words, if your bobbin turns clockwise, make sure the thread exiting the bobbin comes out counterclockwise. This procedure will help to minimize kinks in the line.
  • If the roll unwinding does not match the bobbin rotation, simply turn the roll over.

Step 2. Tie new line to reel

Raise the thread dispensing handle arm and pass the end of the new thread through the rod grommets to the reel. Tie the line as follows:

  • Pass the line around the reel.
  • With the free end, tie a single knot around the main thread.
  • Tying a second simple knot near the end of the free thread prevents it from coming apart.
  • Tighten knot around reel and cut excess thread near end.
  • Note: If you are using very thin thread and do not want the knot volume, use electrical tape to secure the thread to the reel.
  • Close the line distribution handle.

Step 3. Hold the thread between two fingers to keep it taut as you wind a few inches on the reel

Step 4. Stop winding and sink the rod into the ground towards the coil

Confirm that the thread roll is being wound on the reel evenly. If the line is correct, go ahead and finish. If not, go back and repeat the steps to make sure the thread coming out of the roll of thread is winding onto the reel spool in the same direction.

For a reel, a good way to wind the thread is to take a soft cotton fabric and hold the thread to the fabric at the height of the first loop. Put a lot of tension on it so the thread doesn't wind up loosely and you can spin as fast as you like

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 5

Step 5. Inflate the reel only until the line is about 2.5 cm from the edge

Method 2 of 3: Reel

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 6

Step 1. Place a pencil inside the new reel and have someone hold it - or use a reel-filler bracket you can buy at a fishing tackle store - to hold the reel of line

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 7

Step 2. Roll up to 2.5 cm from the outer edge

Keep a little pressure on the line so it doesn't snag or snag.

Method 3 of 3: Closed Reel

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 8

Step 1. Unscrew the cap

Before you can wind the line, you will need to tie it to the reel.

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 9

Step 2. Check the direction in which the bobbin turns

Depending on the brand, some rotate clockwise, others counterclockwise. Now look at the new roll and check the direction that the new line unwinds from the roll.

  • For each reel you must make sure that the bobbin rotation and the roll unwind match. In other words, if your bobbin turns clockwise, make sure the thread exiting the bobbin comes out counterclockwise. This procedure will help to minimize kinks in the line.
  • If the roll unwinding does not match the bobbin rotation, simply turn the roll over.
Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 10

Step 3. Pass the thread through the front hole of the cover

Then fasten the new line to the reel. Raise the thread dispensing handle arm and pass the end of the new thread through the rod grommets to the reel. Tie the line as follows:

  • Pass the line around the reel.
  • With the free end, tie a single knot around the main thread.
  • Tying a second simple knot near the end of the free thread prevents it from coming apart.
  • Tighten knot around reel and cut excess thread near end.
  • Note: If you are using very thin thread and do not want the knot volume, use electrical tape to secure the thread to the reel.
Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 11

Step 4. Screw cap back onto reel before proceeding

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 12

Step 5. Hold the thread between two fingers to keep it taut as you wind a few inches on the reel

Spool New Fishing Line Onto a Reel Step 4

Step 6. Stop winding and drive the rod through the ground towards the bobbin

Confirm that the thread roll is being wound on the reel evenly. If the line is correct, go ahead and finish. If not, go back and repeat the steps to make sure the thread coming out of the roll of thread is winding onto the reel spool in the same direction.

A good way to wind the thread is to take a soft cotton fabric and hold the thread to the fabric at the height of the first loop. Put a lot of tension in so the thread doesn't curl loosely, and you can spin as fast as you like

Tips

  • Closed reels don't fit much thread, so be sure to unscrew the cap from time to time to see how much thread is left in there.
  • To attach the new thread to the bobbin, you can tie it with a straight knot, but be sure to tie the knot firmly over the bobbin so it doesn't slip. A tape on the reel spool really helps with the line slipping problem.
  • Pass the new line through an old phone book to maintain line pressure and free hand (especially with a multifilament line!).
  • If you have a lot of kinks in your line, remove the bait and simply leave a lot of loose line behind the boat as you go forward. This will remove the kinks.
  • Place the old line in a line recycling box. You can find them at most fishing tackle stores.
  • If using multifilament thread, be sure to first place a fabric ribbon or a layer of monofilament on the reel. Otherwise the line will slip around the bobbin and will not be able to secure the hook.
  • To avoid snags while you fish, keep tension on the line while you're winding. If necessary, hold the line between your thumb and forefinger at the front of the reel.
  • If you like to use a thread for as long as possible, wind the old thread into another roll, then wind it back up again. So the used thread is at the bottom, at the base, and the newer thread is at the top, where you use it.
  • If you don't have a boat, simply remove the bait and tie the line to a pole. Walk forward, unwinding the line behind you. Now get someone to cut the end of the thread so you can rewind it, but make sure you keep the tension in your fingers.
  • Using a thread conditioner to treat the spools prior to winding the reel spool will help the thread to wrap around the reel with less twists. Regular use of a line conditioner before and after fishing will protect your line and help them last longer and give you the longest, most accurate casts.

Notices

  • NEVER dispose of the old line by dropping it on the ground or into the water. Birds and fish curl into ancient lines and die.
  • Biting the thread can chip or break your tooth.

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