6 Ways to Make a Fishing Knot

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6 Ways to Make a Fishing Knot
6 Ways to Make a Fishing Knot
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Fishing is one of the best hobbies ever created. There's nothing like enjoying the fresh morning air at the water's edge tossing your line and watching the sunlight shimmer as the bait hits the water. A short time later, your line pulls and, after a few minutes of work, you catch a 20-pound lake trout. To make sure the bait will stand up to the fight you need to tie a good knot. While catching the fish is up to you, we'll show you how to tie a hook or bait to a fishing line.

Steps

Method 1 of 6: Clinch Node

Step 1. Use the clinch knot as your trusted fishing knot

The clinch knot is probably the most popular of the fishing knots. That's because it's simple to tie, easy to remember and fulfills its role in terms of durability. Use the clinch for everyday fishing knots.

Step 2. Input the line

Pass the end of the line through the eye of the hook.

Step 3. Wind the line:

Wrap the end of the thread around the thread (back toward the spool) four to six turns.

Step 4. Make the knot

Pass the end of the thread through the loop you created in step one.

Improve the clinch knot by passing the thread through the loop created in the last step. This is called the "Improved Clinch Node"

Step 5. Tighten the knot

A little moisture here helps a lot. Wet the line in your mouth to lubricate.

Step 6. Trim the excess thread above the knot

Leave only about 3mm.

Method 2 of 6: Orvis Node

Step 1. Use the Orvis knot as a strong and easy alternative to the clinch knot

Step 2. Attach the hook

Pass the line through the eye of the hook from the bottom to the top.

Step 3. Form a figure eight by crossing the line and passing the end back through the middle of the first loop formed

Step 4. Pass the end through the top of the second loop, then repeat one pass through the loop

Step 5. Finish the node

Lubricate the thread, then pull the end to close the knot. Cut off excess thread.

Method 3 of 6: Palomar Node

Step 1. Use the Palomar knot if you want the best knot to use with multifilament fishing lines

The Palomar may look complicated, but once you've mastered it, it's almost a perfect knot. It doesn't take long to perfect it either.

Step 2. Duplicate six inches of line and pass the double line through the eye of the hook

Step 3. Create a single knot with the double row

Make sure the hook is hanging from the bottom of the line.

Step 4. Pass the loop of double thread under the hook and back over the eye of the hook

Step 5. Tighten by pulling on both the tip and the main thread

Cut off the excess tip.

Method 4 of 6: Davy Node

Tie a Fishing Knot Step 7

Step 1. Use the Davy knot for small flies

The Davy knot is widely used among fly-fishers who want a quick, simple, and discreet knot for tying a small fly. The Davy knot will allow you to quickly return to fishing if your line breaks.

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Step 2. Pass the thread through the eye of the hook

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Step 3. Form a loose loop with the end of the thread

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Step 4. Pass the end of the line and the hook itself through the loop

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Step 5. Tighten the knot by pulling the end of the thread

Method 5 of 6: Baja Node

Tie a Fishing Knot Step 12

Step 1. Use a Baja knot for heavier monofilaments

Can be used to join two lines or to tie a hook or other accessory to the line. The knot needs to be tight after it is tied, after which it will not slip.

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Step 2. Make the first loop

Create a single loop about two inches from the end of the line.

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Step 3. Slide a hook into the base of the loop and let it hang while you make the rest of the knot

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Step 4. Make the second loop

Place the end of the thread through the front of the first loop and under the main thread. Pull the thread until the second loop is slightly shorter than the first.

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Step 5. Make a third loop by repeating the previous step

Adjust the size so that it is between the large and small handles.

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Step 6. Slide the hook to the top of the first handle

Then, thread it through the middle of the middle loop and go back under the larger loop. Tighten the knot a little.

Tie a Fishing Knot Step 18

Step 7. Finish the node

Hold the hook with pliers and pull the line tight to tighten everything.

Method 6 of 6: Pitzen Node

Tie a Fishing Knot Step 29

Step 1. Use the Pitzen knot for incredible strength

The Pitzen knot, also known as the Eugene Bend or 16-20, is famous for withstanding up to 95% of the strength of the line. It's a little complicated, but it's worth it.

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Step 2. Pass the thread through the eye of the hook

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Step 3. Loop the end of the thread under the main thread

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Step 4. Using the index finger as a support, loop the thread around the finger

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Step 5. Wrap the line around the parallel lines four times

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Step 6. Pass the end of the thread through the small loop created by your finger

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Step 7. Tighten the knot by sliding it to the eye of the hook

Do this with your fingers and not pulling the main thread.

Tips

  • Sometimes using a spinner can help. A spinner is an accessory that you attach your bait to to connect it to your line. It allows your bait to move more freely and prevents annoying line kinks.
  • Reading glasses are a useful addition to the gear box.
  • Nail clippers work very well for cutting the line.

Notices

  • The hooks are very sharp; avoid contact with your eyes, skin or other parts of your body.
  • When fishing, keep your fishing license with you; if not, you may have problems with the Environmental Police.

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